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. frankly, that's not the story. also, i want to show you that there are lessons to be learned from japan. dare i say it, we should prepare like japan. the answer is the same as it has always been. sanity, common sense, preparation. here is an idea? what do you say we live by the ten rules handed down from the top of the mountain. no, that's crazy. and apocalyptic! ♪ ♪ >> glenn: hello, america. it is impossible to adequately put in words the amount of destruction and suffering that is going on now in japan. last week's quake was the fifth biggest since they started measuring. and the largest ever in japan. it was almost a 9 on the richter scale. what does that mean? scientists are now saying that is an earthquake that happens once every 1,000 years. the u.s. geological survey says the quake shifted part of japan coastline. ready for this? japan has moved 13 feet closer to the united states. the earth moved ten inches because of this and the tsunami. the earth's axis was tilted slightly and shortened the length of the day by a couple of millionths of a second. part of japan's elevation
. myers. i promise you. stay with cnn for the latest on what's happening tonight in japan. coming up tonight at 10:00 eastern, i'll be watching, hope you will as well. anderson cooper hosting a special edition of "a c360" live from japan. now to my colleague wolf blitzer in paris traveling with secretary of state hillary clinton leading up to "the situation room." wolf? >>> prook, thanks very much. happening now, we're following breaking news. a new reactor breakdown adds to fears of a nuclear disaster in japan. u.n. experts insist there's no sign of a meltdown right now, but over the past few hours we've seen another explosion, a radiation spike and almost constant danger. it's 6:00 a.m. tuesday morning in japan, and rescuers are racing against time. we're with the crews searching for survivors and bodies. over three days after that monster quake and tsunami, and the other major story we're following right now. libyan rebels, they are retreating. they are being defeated in some key towns. we're keeping the spotlight on moammar gadhafi's brutal fight to hold on to power. i'm in pair
edition of "world business today" as cnn continues its coverage of the earthquake and tsunami in japan. >>> sea walter being poured from helicopters on to japan's damaged nuclear reactors. that is the scene on thursday. engineers attempt once again to avert catastrophic radiation leaks. the japanese military is dropping tons of water on to two of the six reactors at the fukushima daiichi nuclear plant trying to cool the plant's fuel rods. but the company that runs the plant now reports that the radiation levels actually increased. they're also bringing in police, water cannon. officials say radiation levels right now are too high for personnel to venture inside. >> translator: spence force conducted a spring of water from the air. and the police are also going to start the water spraying by the water cannon trucks. so we're trying to combine the two approaches to maximize the effect of water spraying. >> hundreds of thousands of residents in the area have been evacuated. many are seeking refuge in public shelters. japan ordered people to move at least 20 kilometers away from the plant.
, this is "world business today." we're following two big stories for you this friday, march 18th. >>> in japan, urgent attempts to avert a nuclear crisis enter a second week at the fukushima daiichi plant. workers douse one of the rea reactors with a water cannon. >>> in libya, gunfire in benghazi. but this time in celebration. rebels are rejoicing. but fears of retaliation by moammar gadhafi's forces are pushing the price of oil higher of. >>> so let's go straight to one of our top stories. the u.n. security council has put moammar gadhafi on notice that it will no longer permit his military bombardment of rebel positions from the air. while the council approved a no-fly zone on thursday authorizing "all necessary measures to protect civilians," libyan's ambassador to the united nations warmly welcomed thursday's revolution. he sides with the opposition and has called on gadhafi to step down. >> i would like to start by thanking the members of the security council for the resolution today. it is a clear message -- it is a clear message to the libyan people that they are not alone, that the in
and britain advised their nationals to leave tokyo and the north of japan. >> welcome to bbc world news. i am kara in london. also in this program -- in rain in your security forces. the message to bahrain by the u.n.'s top security official. the crisis and i riposte shows no signs of ending -- the crisis and the ivory coast shows no signs of ending. hello. seven days after the disaster, japanese authorities are still battling to bring stability to the stricken fukushima power or plan. let joined my colleague tony wilcox. >> hello, and welcome to japan where authorities are still trying to cool down the stricken nuclear plant in fukushima. the united states government and the british government has now advised all nationals living in tokyo and the north of the country to leave the area if they wish, and flights are being arranged. let's just have a look at some of the developments in the past few hours. it is early evening. darkins has volunteered but this morning, japanese military helicopters were dropping up to 7 tons of sea water at a time over the four reactors at that fukushima plant. t
>>> disaster in japan. efforts to control that crippled nuclear power plant have failed. officials admit burying the reactors in cement may be the only option left. as japan remembers the devastating quake and tsunami that hit one week ago today, changing their country forever. >>> and the battle for libya. the u.n. security council gives the okay for international military action against moammar gadhafi's forces. military action against moammar gadhafi's forces. but is it too little, too late? captioning funded by cbs >>> good morning, everybody, and thanks for joining us, i'm betty nguyen. the nuclear crisis in japan moves into its second week. and this morning, the head of the u.n.'s nuclear energy agency says japan is racing against the clock. here's the latest. engineers hope to reconnect electricity to at least two of the reactors at the fukushima daiichi power plant sometime today. but, it is unclear if any of the cooling systems will work. smoke is rising from reactor number 2, but officials don't know why. fire trucks are now being used to spray water on the plant, and att
't forget there are enormous numbers of earthquakes in japan. people are not completely terrified every time there is an earthquake. it happens a lot. it's just that this earthquake was one of the most powerful ones ever recorded. one of the interesting things when you get back to the nuclear power plants, thomas, is the nuclear power plants were designed to with stand earthquakes that were five times less powerful than the one that hit them. they weren't designed to sustain a tsunami at the same time. you have to ask was the planning correct here? that's easier in hindsight, but was it correct in terms of safety measures. >> bob, thank you very much. appreciate it. >>> the situation with japan's nuclear reactor brings to mind for a lot of people the 1986 chernobyl disaster in russia and 1979's three mile island disaster in pennsylvania. joining me on the phone is dick thornburg who was governor of pennsylvania during the three mile island crisis. what has been going through your head as you watch the events unfolding in japan and the talk and fear about the nuclear reactors there? >> there
in this story. >>> that frantic battle to contain a nuclear situation growing more serious by the moment. japan is asking the u.s. for help and a very, very small particle of radiation has reached the united states. japan just raised the level of this nuclear incident from a 4 to a 5, although other experts had already pegged it at a 6 on the scale of 7. nuclear experts have been saying for days, japan is underplaying this crisis. here are the official numbers. 6,539 people are dead. of course that number has been climbing steadily. right now, another 10,354 people still missing. as japan struggles to deal with the aftermath of this disaster, 410,000 people are living in shelters or with friends because they have no homes to go to or had to leave the contamination zone. take a look at this new video. it is the closest look we had at japan's troubled fukushima nuclear complex. it's the reason why many people are leaving. a diplomat just told the associated press that a miniscule levels of radiation have reached california's coast. although he says it's, quote, about a billion times beneath level
with the latest nuclear developments out of japan's tsunami disaster zone. officials have been concerned over radiation levels at the damaged plant in fukushima. they hit dangerous highs on monday and have now dropped back to where the government says they're no longer threat to human health. there have been explosions, though at the reactors number one, two, and three. authorities say water levels are now stable at reactors one and three. the fire is now out at number four. however, reactor number two the still may be in trouble with a new explosion there this tuesday. and questions about whether the containment vessel is breached. there's a no-fly zone in 30 kilometers within the plant. the plant's owners have ordered all but 50 of their workers to leave. and officials say at least 500 people remain within the evacuation zone. here is japan's chief cabinet secretary on what precautions residents should be taking. >> translator: please keep the windows shut. do not use ventilation. and if you are to hang your laundry, please keep them indoors. and the further away you move from the power pla
. >> since filing that report, brian is now on the way to japan with the fairfax search and rescue team. he'll be reporting later from japan for all of us. we want to welcome our viewers here in the united states and around the world. this is a special edition of "the situation room." happening now, conflicting reports about a dangerous emergency at one of japan's earthquake-damaged nuclear power plants. an official with japan's nuclear and industrial safety agency tells cnn a meltdown may, repeat, may be under way. but japan's ambassador to the united states tells me that's not true. he says there is no meltdown. on top of that, we're seeing reports of a second reactor at the same facility, report that is it failed just hours ago. but the story and the scope of the disaster is much bigger. the official death toll from friday's catastrophic earthquake and tsunami is now at 686, but the toll will be much, much higher. in just one town, nearly 10,000 people are now formally officially listed as missing. so far, at least 3,000 people have been rescued. you're watching cnn's continuing coverage
jones industrial average was up 150 points on signs japan could be getting the upper hand and he cuts it down to size and the news breaks he is saying he will threaten his people and then trade is fighting out, some cutting out, and others back in, so it finishes up 160 points so they dismiss the crazy guy for now. if you needed the prove, the forces are alive and well at wall and broad. but who wins? the one trying to contain the nuclear menace or the other being a many nasa. and what do you say? >>guest: we are at a crossroads and we are in a global economy. it is amazing 24 slash -- 24/7, and everyone is happy with the nuclear contains and muammar qaddafi comes out and stocks fall apart so we don't know from minute to minute or day-to-day the next headline and it makes it difficult to ride the roller coaster. >>neil: global events dictate the market. will that be the rule for a while? >>guest: it will be the rule for a long time. the foreseeable future. the two events we are talking about, were unforeseen. we were not thinking libya would fall apart six months ago or for see we hav
authorizing all necessary measures. we'll have that coming up. three reactors with partial meltdowns in japan and the desperate attempt to stop the worst from happening. and there is breaking news at this hour. the united nations security council has voted to allow the u.n.'s member nations to take military action against libya. the vote opens the door for the united states to begin air strikes against libya at any time. the "new york times" reporting u.s. officials in the obama administration began to believe a no fly zone by itself would make no difference. these officials, "the times" reporting says began pushing for what's called a no drive zone, specifically the use of u.s. military air strikes to cut down gadhafi's ground forces to tanks and heavy artillery. the u.s. push for tonight's vote on the security council. the resolution approved 10-0 with five countries abstaining says that the u.n., quote, will take all necessary measures to protect civilians and civilian populated areas under threat of attack in libya including bin ghazi. if you're worried about u.s. ground forces going into
from a horrific earthquake and tsunami. plus this. video coming out of japan is devastating and this is some of the most compelling. a roof collapse is captured in a theater. we're devoting most of this hour to the amazing video and images captured by those who witnessed it up close. i'm talking about cnn ireporters in japan. it is a special ireport newscast here. >>> and there's lots of other big news happening right here in the u.s. look at those pictures, including a tragic bus accident in new york city that killed at least 14 people. a live report just moments away. i'm don lemon, thank you for joining us. let's get you caught up on the news right now. >>> let's start in japan where the eyes of the world or on the devastation there. the clock is particularing to find survivors after the 8.9 magnitude earthquake and the tsunami that followed. crews have rescued more than 3,000 people but thousands more are missing, nearly 10,000 in one town alone. japanese media report the death toll is more than 900, but that number is expected to rise. six million households are without
the will and the determination to come back after something like this, it is japan. and we'd like to encourage you to help them. they need it. we've made it really easy for you. just go to our web page cnn.com/impact. >>> and now it's time for me to pass it over to brooke baldwin. brooke, you can't help but want to help these people when you look at these images? >> absolutely. cnn.com/impact. thank you, randi. >>> i want to begin this newscast today with an image i cannot shake. an entire village wiped out in 90 seconds. 90 seconds for the ocean to swell and overtake this one town while those who live there, those who had moved quickly enough, watched from higher ground. watch this with me. >> doesn't that just take your breath away? imagine you're one of the fortunate perched atop this hill watching your home, your town, people scrambling in the bottom left watching it all being wiped away. that was friday in miyagi prefecture. the twin forces in that tsunami were just the beginning. look at this. we have the satellite photo from digital globe and it shows the damage to the reactors at the fukushima daiichi
as soon as we get it. >>> top u.s. nuclear officials say it could take days even weeks to get japan's nuclear plant contained. officials have tried to use even water cannons. this is an animated model that shows what could happen to the plume of radiation from that damaged japanese reactor. federal officials say this does not pose a danger but here on the coast, scientists are keeping a watchful eye on that plume. as more people head out of japan into the united states, passengers are coming under new scrutiny as security agents begin screening for radiation. >>> meanwhile, president obama has been trying to reassure americans that we are safe. they don't expect harmful levels of radiation to reach the west coast or any other part of the united states. >> further more the centers of disease control do not recommend the people of the united states take precautionary measures beyond staying informed. >> the president also promised to keep americans up to date on the crisis in japan. >>> the california department of public health today joined with all of the others who were saying that
fan at the same time. we're also on japan and the guy who knows all important about how japan is to the financial world. joe brown, giant at ubs. the former democratic governor of virginia, doug wilder. this weekend, world coming back from the brink. we're here live saturday. >> glenn: hello, america. i want to welcome you to the "glenn beck program" and tell you tonight i'm going to lay out a theory. i have a lot of facts but i want to separate from facts from theory and you have to help figure this out. something is very wrong. it has been a busy couple of weeks for the president. there is a lot going on in the world. his job to lead the free world. what is he doing? he just carted his 60th round of golf as president. who hasn't golfed at least 60 times in the last two years? then, of course, the ncaa brackets. there is always a crisis. march madness is only once a year. today is st. patty's day. president went to capitol hill to celebrate that with congressional leaders. tomorrow, it's off for a well-deserved vacation in beautiful rio de janeiro. wow! may i just ask is he b
>> hello everyone. welcome to our special coverage of the events in japan. >> welcome. >> here are the top stories of this hour. workers at the fukushima nuclear plant are scrambling to save the reactors from a meltdown following last week's devastating earthquake and tsunami. in libya, the government says its supporters are making gains at the expense of rivals. the u.n. secretary general urges all sides in the conflict to cause a ceasefire. captioned by the national captioning institute --www.ncicap.org-- >> nuclear experts in japan are still battling to prevent a meltdown at the fukushima power plant. concerns are growing about a pool holding spent nuclear fuel at the reactor complex. workers are using all means possible to cool the reactors that were damaged in the earthquake. the plant had to be evacuated temporarily at one point due to high levels of radiation. >> dense clouds of stream rose from the fukushima nuclear plant on wednesday. but the fire in reactor four was of less concern to the authorities than a possible fracture to the containment vessel of reactor three.
>>> on the broadcast tonight, the desperate measures under way to get the nuclear crisis in japan under control. >>> and president obama tells americans there's no threat from radiation coming across the pacific. "nightly news" begins now. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> a special good evening to our viewers joining us in the west. while the japanese deal with a staggering humanitarian crisis, they are now engaging in a last-resort effort to stop perhaps multiple meltdowns at nuclear reactors. and today president obama had to reassure the american public especially those along the west coast, that these fears of some sort of radioactive cloud coming across the pacific just aren't true. here now the latest on the disaster in japan. desperate measures now under way to lessen the nuclear disaster. while tonight japanese officials are saying they have rare good news of some levels stabilizing, late today we got the first look at the reactors close up. this new video of a helicopter fly-over showing the destruction. then there are the numbers. just under 5700 dead, ju
'lin sana'a. rick: the president addressing the japan crisis during a news conference. >> i want to be very clear, we do not expect harmful levels of radiation to reach the united states, whether iting the west coast, hawaii, alaska, or u.s. territories in the pacific. rick: officials in japan are calling it a race against time. we have video for you of water being dropped into the overheating reactors at the fukushima plant. this is something that has not proven successful in the past. japan is raising the severity of the situation from a 4 to a 5. the government is acknowledging that it was overwhelmed and continues to be overwhelmed by the situation. gavin blair is on the phone from japan. i understand you are traveling to sendai, which is one of the areas hardest hit by this catastrophy. >> reporter: we just popped through the u.s. exclusion zone or the japanese he can collusion zone. it has been reclassified up to a 5. the chopper missions to drop water has had minimal effect on cool the plant. they tried hosing the plant with fire engines. but apparently the fire truck hoses couldn't
. >> i'm sarah kelly with the business news, welcome. our top stories at this hour -- in japan, the military has used wear from firefighters to cool reactors. the ieae says it has stabilized, but it could still worsen. the security council is voting on libya as the gaddafi forces push into rebel-held territory. the u.n.'s nuclear watch dog says efforts made by japan to cool reactor it's and fuel rods at the fukushima power plant have stabilized the situation but warning it could deteriorate. engineers have worked through the night to install a power line for water pumps needed to cool two reactors and a storage site for spent nuclear fuel rods. helicopters have also been dumping water on overheating reactors to stave off a meltdown. fire trucks have also joined in the effort. >> japan has been pinning a lot of its hopes on these trucks. they can get within 80 meters of the reactor. the trucks have repeatedly doused the pool with water as shown in this graphic from japanese tv. authorities were guarded about the operation's success. some reports say radiation levels have risen s
particles from japan have reached the bay area. they detected it on the student monitors here, i'll tell you if you should be worried coming up. >> live look at golden gate bridge this morning. we've had rain and showers move through. i'm tracking two strong storms that will move through our area in three days. flooding is possible, hail, thunder, maybe power outages. >> road are wet. we've seen a couple of spinouts. >> and libya with frozen airspace after united nations security council votes to put a no-fly zone over the country. >> got some rain out there. possibly slick roads. i'm eric thomas. >> i'm kristen sze. let's talk about that. mike, what is going on? >> we have showers. we talked about showers ahead of the main line. that is exactly what we're dealing with. some of those are stronger and oranges on the radar but seeing some of this tape earned a not be quite as strong. in fact, we had a couple lightning bolts, as it's moving through santa rosa and st. helena, same thing around san rafael heading over 37 around novato and then heading over 37 toward vallejo. then light rain aroun
unitedations enacts a no-fly zone over libya. and here in japan, waiting to see if a nuclear catastrophe can be averted. i'm shepard smith. we'll be with you throughout the night during prime time for continuing updates. this is fox news channel, america's choice for news and information. our thanks to nhk in japan. >> bill: "the o'reilly factor" is on. tonight: >> the obama administration and the american government clearly isn't trusting what's coming misleang the world about the nuclear danger in the country? we analyze this explosive situation and we'll hear both sides. [crying] [siren] >> good boy. >> also, glenn beck, lou dobbs, and ann coulter each have unique takes on the situation in japan. they will all be here. >> the commander and chief barack hussein obama is not marching in the same parade much less an as the same martin luther king. >> bill: and he's back. obama bashing once again. but, should anyone care what reverend jeremiah wright is saying? >> you are about to enter the no-fly zone, -- no spin zone. the factor begins right now. >> i'm bill o'reilly. thanks
,ioioioioioioioioioioioioio. our thanks to nhk in japan. >> bill: "the o'reilly factor" is on. tonight: >> the obama administration and the american government clearly isn't trusting what's coming out of the japanese government. >> bill: is that true? is the japanese government misleading the world about the nuclear danger in the country? we analyze this explosive situation and we'll hear both sides. [crying] [siren] >> good boy. >> also, glenn beck, lou dobbs, and ann coulter each have unique takes on the situation in japan. they will all be here. >> the commander and chief barack hussein obama is not marching in the same parade much less an as the same martin luther king. >> bill: and he's back. obama bashing once again. but, should anyone care what reverend jeremiah wright is saying? >> you are about to enter the no-fly zone, -- no spin zone. the factor begins right now. >> i'm bill o'reilly. thanks for watching us tonight. is japan misloading the world about the nuke danger? that is the subject of this evening's talking points memo. according to a number of reports, there is disagreement between the u.s.a. and
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> brown: japan raced to prevent a radiation catastrophe today as explosions rocked two reactors at a nuclear plant, and government officials urged 140,000 people near the facility to remain inside. good evening. i'm jeffrey brown. >> ifill: and i'm gwen ifill. on the newshour tonight, we have the latest on the rescue efforts in towns along the coast, even as the nation was hit by another powerful aftershock. and the official death toll topped 3,000, with many more homeless. >> brown: we assess the magnitude of the crisis and what's being done to avert a full nuclear meltdown. >> ifill: and ray suarez examines the economic impact of the disaster, as stock markets plunge in japan and around the world. >> brown: plus, paul solman tells the tale of two ohio counties-- once very similar economically, now far apart. >> you could go to a lot of placess around the country and they're living in one high- income reality and a couple counties away it's a whole different world. >> brown: that's all ahead. on tonight's newshour. major fundi
at high point road. now back to you. >>> japan is reaching to the united states asking for help to avert a nuclear crisis. linda so is here to join us about the startling admission japanese officials are making this morning. >> reporter: well, japanese engineers say they might have to bury the nuclear plant in sand and crone crete. it may be -- concrete. it mate be the -- it may be the only way to avoid a catastrophic release of radiation. the rate something on par with what happened in 1979. emergency workers in japan have gotten desperate using water cannons and helicopters to cool the troubled reactors. one expert says it's like using a squirt gun to put out a forest fire. but there is good news this morning. operators at the nuclear plant connected a power line to the complex. they are hoping that line will restart the water pumps needed to cool down the reactors. if that doesn't work, the u.s. is flying in five high pressure water pumps. here at home, the u.s. put up radiation detectors along the west coast just in case. >> there's a lot of space between here and japan, so we don't
to the coverage of the disaster in japan. i'm randi kaye. >> and ivan dr've i'm andrew st. thank you for joining us. >> we heard from the prime minister. he called this the country's worst crisis since world war ii. the situation with the nuclear reactors is adding to power problems for the rest of the country. millions are still without electricity. take a listen to what the prime minister said. >> translator: many power plants have been damaged. and tokyo electric power plant and other power plants are in short supply of the power. especially in tohoku. so the government has instructed the utmost efforts to those power companies to get the supply from other power companies and we'd also like to ask the industries, as well as ordinary households to save energy and power. however, we do not know when those facilities will be restored. so in this situation, we could fall into shortage of power. and if this situation remains like this, we could fall into power outage in a wide area. >> in the coastal areas, some 12,000 people have already been rescued in the aftermath of the earthquake and the ts
. everything else is the little stuff. we wish japan well and in a weird way we thank them for bringing us back to reality. we are there, good day. >> hello eeverybody. i am uma live in washington. america's news headquarters. just when japan thought it couldn't get worse fears surface of a melt down after an explosion in the nuclear power plant in the northeast. the death tollcontinue to rise with entire towns missing. david piper, what is the latest on the struggling nuclear plant that is taking place there? >> well, earlier in the day there was a large explosion and the japanese government said it destroyed the walls that are encircling the nuclear reactor but didn't break the metal consuming tower that protects the reactor from escaping. from what we are hearing at this time, workers are pouring sea water on the reactor to try to cool it down. but at the same time we are hearing reports that 190 people are suffering from radiation sickness and there are reports that there has been some release in the air at this time. the japanese government increased the raduous around the plant to protect
: box number one, japan's government raising the threat level of the damaged nuclear plant. box two, we hear that the japanese officials considering the so-called chernobyl opening to bring the plant under control. live coverage and what that may mean ahead. box three: president obama getting ready for a five-day trip to south america in the middle of all that is happening in japan and the middle east and right here at home. we will discuss the timing with chris wallace. that is ahead unless breaking news changes everything. in "studio b" today. and from japan the government has officially raised the threat level of the badly damaged fukushima nuclear power plant from a level 4 to a level 5 and that is on an international scale of 7 and it puts it on par with the disaster at three mile island. the worst nuclear accident in american history. for context, a level 5 nuclear emergency entails severe damage to a reactor core; the release of massive amount of radiation and high problem deficit of significant public exposure," and several deaths from radiation, and from the director of the pow
't -- the problems doesn't seem to end for japan. now serious fears of radiation. the situation there and the efforts to get americans out safely. >>> and the buzzer. >> oh, the buzzer beaters. upsets last second desperation shots. did you see the butler game? thanks for joining us. i am megan pringle. charley is on go in st. michael, lucky guy because the weather will be beautiful today. meteorologist lynette charles is filling in for justin berk. always lovely to have you here. >> thank you. i love being here with you guys. we are looking at some fabulous weather for today. fabulous friday. we will take it. we will going to be way above average and warm. temperatures in the mid-70s. it's going to be a little breezy but so what. we have sunshine out there. we have temperatures in the mid- 70s. we have a chance for showers possible early on saturday. but they get out quickly. if they do come, we will see high pressure bring in the sunshine. as we look at maryland's most powerful radar, it will stay dry throughout the day. make sure to get out and take advantage of today because you know what, a good
's happening in japan. >> thank you, mr. president. i have two question. on the tragedy in japan. so you already touched on the issue in your opening statement but i'd like to ask about your personal feeling on the situation. you went to japan last year. now, tsunami hit coast of japan and waves washed away cars and houses and japanese people are devastated. i just want to ask about your personal thoughts and feelings on that. and secondly, you also touched on assistance from the united states to japan. and japanese government said that the japan asked for help from u.s. forces in japan. are you willing to provide those assistance? >> the answer to your second question is, yes. i told prime minister kan we'll provide whatever assistance they need. my understanding is the main assistance to provide them is lift capacity. the ability for us to i think help in the cleanup. obviously, when you have a tsunami like this, as well as an earthquake, you have huge disruptions both in the infrastructure. you have boats and houses and cars that are washed in to main thoroughfares and any assistance
, we'll bring that to you live. in japan today here, the focus really is on this number 3 reactor. that is where we saw the video. you see it here of these helicopters dropping water. sea water in this attempt to cool it off and prevent a possible meltdown. tokyo electric or tepco is in this desperate rush to build a power line so the fukushima daiichi plant can power up its cooling systems once again. later on in this newscast, i'll be speaking with a man, an american man who was inside one of the facility, actually in a building next to one of the reactors working when the quake hit last friday. >> cracks were opening up on the ground. i looked over at the buildings around me and glass was breaking, lights, sirens, people screaming. >> can you imagine? he's a software engineer there for a couple weeks working on the power plant's computers. he has not spoken to cn nyet. but he will on this tram. we will also check in with our team in tokyo where shrinking supplies of food and gases are a growing concern. >>> a lot of ground to cover here. right off the bat, i want to show you so
agency says japan's nuclear situation did not worsen friday. even though japanese officials did raise the crisis level. >>> this is the other top story we are reporting about. this was then libya friday amid claims by the government and fighting by the opposition that a cease-fire is in place. an international meeting occurred today and could signal the result of implementing a no-fly zone ordered by the u.n. security council. we began our coverage in japan where officials on friday raised in a clear threat level to five on a scale of 7. engineers say they are still working to restore power to the water pumps at the daiichi facility crippled reactor's this weekend. let's go to anna coren. she joins me in total. let's begin with the ongoing efforts at the nuclear plant. >>> they are hoping power can be restored through a power line. that has not been a change just yet but they're hoping that will be done by today and if that is successful, three and four by tomorrow. restoring power to all six by the end of tomorrow is the best case scenario. that operation on the ground with the use o
of the earthquake in japan and the fallout rippling truly across the world. i'm kate bolduan. >> i'm holly graham. we would like to welcome our viewers. some startling images have come into us the last few hours after this 8.9 magnitude quake. right now live pictures for you. the west coast of the u.s. in the cross-hairs and bracing for tsunami waves. a california emergency spokesman says northern california near crescent city could see the largest waves reaching six feet within the next hour. >> watching that very closely. tsunami waves have already reached hawaii's shores. sirens have been going off across the island in a full-scale coastal evacuation has been underway. you're seeing early morning hours there. the waves a bit kicking up as you can see. >> now, kate, we want to show our views some of the dramatic video and start with a historic tremor. 8.9 magnitude. one of the most powerful in recorded history. >> it's really a truly amazing. cameras were rolling when the ground started shaking. we want to just stop and listen for a moment to the moment the earthquake struck. terrify to go even
beck, lou dobbs, and ann coulter each have unique takes on the situation in japan. they will all be here. >> the commander and chief barack hussein obama is not marching in the same parade much less an as the same martin luther king. >> bill: and he's back. obama bashing once again. but, should anyone care what reverend jeremiah wright is saying? >> you are about to enter the no-fly zone, -- no spin zone. the factor begins right now. >> i'm bill o'reilly. thanks for watching us tonight. is japan misloading the world about the nuke danger? that is the subject of this evening's talking points memo. according to a number of reports, there is disagreement between the u.s.a. and japan over how dangerous the nuclear leak situation really is. the u.s. military has ordered military personnel to be 50 miles away from the leaking reactors. japan is an 18-mile warning zone. and the obama administration is sending private planes into japan to evacuate americans if they want to leave. now, in public, both governments say they are in synch with each other. some in the media dispute that. >> th
alert. t the disaster in japan keeps getting worse. japanese officials confirm that a meltdown could be occurring and we will have the latest. >> dave: this as the death toll is rising, the number of people killed could top a staggering 10,000 in one state alone. >> clayton: take a look at this, satellite image showing what a city in japan looked like before and then after the tsunami. stunning images show how powerful the natural disaster really was. "fox & friends," hour two, starts right now. . >> dave: for many of you it's hour number one, those of you that didn't spring forward and get the clocks reset. it is hour number two. >> clayton: and a lot happening. the nuclear explosion in one of the plants was-- the word from the government that the plant is on the verge of a meltdown. >> alisyn: hard to know. what's the late s, david. >> reporter: there's a warning from the government that there could be an explosion at the plant, there's been a build up of hydrogen, different from the one yesterday and warning that there could have been already a partial meltdown of one of the unit
missing japanese are returning to japan. >>> among the 28 japanese who remain unaccounted for in christchurch are a number of nurses. they were studying english there. why are japanese nurses going a abroad to study and work? nhk world found out. >> reporter: nhk world found out. >> reporter: noriko is one of the missing japanese who left for christchurch in january. after working as a nurse in japan for about seven years, she went overseas in the hope of acquiring english skills and becoming involved with international nursing activities. she had taken part in the activities of a nonprofit organization in cambodia. a doctor, who also was a teammate, praises her. >> translator: she's cheerful and positive about everything. i think she is an excellent nurse. >> reporter: her school offered english for nurses who wanted to work overseas. many japanese nurses were in the school in christchurch when it collapsed. this woman has been a nurse for six years. just like others, she wants to work in developing countries or a disaster site in the future. >> translator: i want to help
have to anticipate and be prepared. >>> up next, we're going to turn to japan. radiation from japan detected today in california. we've got the latest on japan's today in california. we've got the latest on japan's nuclear emergency. sssssss to skate o ce. what was i thinking? but i was still skating on thin ice with my cholesterol. anyone with high cholesterol may be at increased risk of heart attack. diet and exercise weren't enough for me. i stopped kidding myself. i've been eating healthier, exercising more and now i'm also taking lipitor. if you've been kidding yourself about high cholesterol, stop. lipitor is a cholesterol-lowering medication, fda approved to reduce the risk of heart attack and stroke in patients who have heart disease or risk factors for heart disease. lipitor is backed by over 18 years of research. [ female announcer ] lipitor is not for everyone, including people with liver problems and women who are nursing, pregnant, or may become pregnant. you need simple blood tests to check for liver problems. tell your doctor if you are taking other medications or if
york. the president is expected to make a statement about japan at 3:30 eastern time as japan grapples with a nuclear crisis and the aftermath of the earthquake and tsunami there. the latest, the death toll stands at 5,429. nearly 10,000 people still missing. at the pufukushima nuclear plan desperate attempts to cool the reactor but these efforts are having limited impact. and the danger of radiation has delayed efforts to permanently restore water to the pumps to cool the reactor. power may not be up and rung until tomorrow at the earliest. the spnk giving military families the okay to leave major u.s. bases across japan. that order covers more than 40,000 people there. in addition, the u.s. is sending potassium iodide into the country in case people want to use it. and as a precaution, homeland secretary janet napolitano says all passengers and cargo from japan will now be screened for radiation in an abundance of caution. let's get to the white house briefing now. press secretary jay carney joined by gregory jaczko of the nuclear regulatory commission in this country. let's listen.
of the catastrophe unleashed by friday's earthquake and tsunami in japan. officials estimate the death toll could exceed 10,000, as the nation struggles with a mounting economic, nuclear, and humanitarian crisis. good evening. i'm gwen ifill. >> suarez: and i'm ray suarez. on the newshour tonight, we have on the ground reports from several towns on japan's northeastern coast, where the search for survivors continues. >> ifill: we update the international rescue effort aimed at getting food, shelter, and medical help to victims. >> suarez: and we talk to newshour science correspondent miles o'brien and radiation expert david brenner about the state of japan's nuclear reactors. >> ifill: plus, margaret warner examines saudi arabia's military move into neighboring bahrain after a weekend of protests. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: breathe in. breathe out. as volatile as the markets have been lately, having the security of a strong financial partner certainly lets you breathe easier. for more than 140 years, pacific life has
the u.s. will now lead military action to stop gadhafi's brutal crackdown. and in japan, the nuclear crisis goes up a notch, increased to a higher alert level. what will it take to cool down those reactors and prevent a nuclear meltdown. our teams are on the ground across the world and "nightly news" begins now. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> a special good evening to our viewer in the west tonight. tonight we have to take you on something of a tour of the world to cover the overwhelming amount of news going on. and while we have been focused on the disaster in japan, where the nuclear alert level actually went up a notch today, while it's been going on for exactly a week tonight, instead we must begin tonight back in libya. today president obama announced that on top of the twor wars we're fighting, the u.s. will now take the lead on possible military action in libya. the u.n. approved it last night. it started out as a no-fly zone but has grown into something perhaps bigger. a nato ultimatum of gadhafi of libya that the president says is non-negotiable. gadhafi d
in libya. also breaking news on the deteriorating situation in japan. so welcome, once again, to "american morning." it's been a week now since all of this happened. the tsunami, the earthquake, the number of dead in japan continuing to rise as hopes fade of finding any more survivors amid the rubble. in the meantime, the radiation concerns are spreading, as well. crews are now desperately trying to cool down fuel at one nuclear reactor. the number of dead has climbed to 6,500 people. and the search grows more frantic with 10,000 people still missing. >>> turning to fast-moving developments in libya, stopping gadhafi. britain, france, and the u.s. are scrambling to enforce a no-fly zone over libya now that the u.n. security council has authorized all necessary measures. cnn international correspondent nic robertson is live in tripoli. good morning, nic. >> reporter: good morning, christine. well, we've already heard from the deputy foreign minister here who says he doesn't expect immediate air strikes here, but wouldn't say what preparations the army or anyone else in the country may be ta
. >>> here are the developments we're following this morning on the disaster in japan. president obama is allowing family members of u.s. government workers in japan to evacuate. arrangements are being made for charter flights. an earlier white house order told americans in japan to stay at least 50 miles away from the fukushima nuclear plant. japanese military helicopters have been dropping water on that crippled plant today. they're hoping the aerial assault will cool off the reactors and avoid a total meltdown. >>> the japanese stock market opened lower today. taking back yesterday's gains. the yen soared to a new high against the dollar on the currency markets. >>> finally, while the world watches the tragic events in japan, many wonder what we can do here to help. this includes one little massachusetts girl. >> she sprang into action selling her most precious items in hopes that she can help those who need it the most. here's tricia taskey of our affiliate wggb. >> here. >> this is autumn. and it's going to be hard for me to give her away. >> reporter: 7-year-old sage freeman is p
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